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CNN's Attempt to Ruin Trump with Autism Question Backfires Badly Print E-mail
Written by Robert Smith   
Friday, 18 September 2015

During the widely televised Republican debates hosted by CNN, debate moderators tried to destroy Donald Trump with a "gotcha" question about vaccines and autism.

Of all the candidates running for President, Donald Trump is the only one who has publicly expressed intelligent skepticism over the insane vaccine schedule now being pushed on the children of America by a federal government that's run by Big Pharma profit interests.

CNN plays "gotcha" with Trump, but it backfires

CNN clearly plotted to attempt to discredit Donald Trump on this issue, posing a question to him that was laced with all the usual pro-vaccine propaganda which falsely claims that vaccines have no risks and couldn't possibly be linked to autism. The question to Trump was essentially accusing him of being medically incompetent or scientifically insane. But when CNN posed the question to Trump, he answered brilliantly.


Stating that he's in favor of the principle of vaccines, Trump explained, "But I want smaller doses over a longer period of time."

Trump, like many informed pediatricians and parents, is extremely skeptical of the false promises claimed by the CDC and the vaccine industry it promotes. Trump even went on to tell this story about vaccines and autism:

Autism has become an epidemic... Because you take a baby in, and I've seen it, and I've seen it, and I had my children taken care of, over a long period of time, over a two or three year period of time, same exact amount, but you take this little beautiful baby, and you pump -- I mean, it looks just like it's meant for a horse, not for a child, and we've had so many instances, people that work for me, just the other day, two-years-old, two-and-a-half-years-old, a child, a beautiful child went to have the vaccine, and came back, and a week later got a tremendous fever, got very, very sick, now is autistic. ...I'm in favor of vaccines [but] do them over a longer period of time, same amount, but just in little sections. I think you're going to have -- I think you're going to see a big impact on autism.


CNN then tries to cajole Ben Carson into attacking Trump, but that backfires, too
Next, CNN turned to Ben Carson and prompted him to attack Donald Trump for his answer. While professing his belief in vaccines, Carson added this one stunning statement that backfired in the face of CNN:

Ben Carson: "We are probably giving way too many in too short a period of time..."

With now TWO candidates in the debate stating they believe there are too many vaccines given too early, CNN then turned to Rand Paul, hoping Paul would attack Trump.

Instead, Rand Paul confirmed what both Donald Trump and Ben Carson both said: that there are too many vaccines given too close together:

Rand Paul: "I'm all for vaccines, but I'm also for freedom. I'm concerned about how they're bunched up... I ought to have the right to spread out the vaccines a little bit..."

Finally, Mike Huckabee chimed in on the whole scam of Big Pharma, asking, "Why doesn't this country focus on cures rather than treatment? Why don't we focus on the cure for cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's?"

CNN then abruptly cut him off and changed the subject as quickly as possible.

 

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